Three’s a crowd…Of zombies — Resident Evil 3 remake announced

It hasn’t even been a full year since the remake of Resident Evil 2 hit the shelves, and Capcom isn’t done yet.  Recently, the publishing powerhouse from Japan has announced that a remake of Resident Evil 3 will arrive in 2020, providing another dose of nostalgia for those who love reminiscing about classic zombie-shooters.  Coming along for the ride is a multiplayer mode called Resident Evil Resistance, an online battle between a team of four and a “mastermind” who sets all the traps.  Considering how heavily-revered the previous remake has been, I have full confidence this next one will be nothing short of enthralling.  The zombie-shooting fun resumes on April 3.

The ballpark is expanding — MLB The Show coming to other platforms in 2021 or later

I’ve said this before, and I’m gonna say it again…The baseball videogame market is definitely not the same as it was back in the early 2000’s.  If you want a serious game of virtual hardball, you’re gonna need a PS4 and a copy of Sony’s MLB The Show.  Baseball fans who don’t have a PS4 have long complained about how they’re left in the dugout when it comes to being able to own a game where you can do anything that has to do with our national pastime.  However, Sony has listened loud and clear, and they recently pulled some huge news out of the bullpen — As early as 2021, MLB The Show will be available for more than just the PS4, meaning that owners of the Xbox One, Nintendo Switch, and possibly even Windows PC can get their mitts (Get it?) on Sony’s long-running baseball franchise.  Considering we haven’t had a simulation-style MLB game on multiple platforms since the MLB 2K series threw in the towel, this is very good news for baseball-gaming considering The Show probably won’t have any competition anytime soon.  For now, MLB The Show ’20 will be exclusive to the PS4, and we’re waiting for Sony San Diego to reveal the new features this game is cooking up.

In for a shock — 2K confirms new BioShock game in development

If there’s a question that 2K Games has received ad nauseam, it’s along the lines of “Where the heck is the next BioShock game?” Well, thanks to a recent announcement from 2K themselves, we don’t have to ask that question anymore.  Their brand new studio Cloud Chamber will be working for “the next several years” on the latest game in this ultra-popular FPS series.  Not only is the developer roster composed of people who worked on the first three games, but it is being captained by Kelley Gillmore (Who has experience working on IP’s like Civilization and XCOM).  The fourth title in the BioShock series certainly won’t be a launch title for the next-gen hardware, but the folks at 2K will do everything in their ability to make this game as polished as it can be.

Code-cracking madness — Codemasters acquires Slightly Mad Studios

It’s time to talk about another acquisition that I and at least one other person didn’t see coming, and it once again involves the racing-game genre.  Codemasters has a handful of ongoing series in their garage, such as DirtGrid, and the official Formula 1 games.  They now own new territory thanks to their acquisition of fellow British developer Slightly Mad Studios, makers of the Project CARS IP.  If you ask me, this is a big deal because they’re two of the most prominent companies when it comes to today’s racing games, not to mention they both have really good assets and licenses.  With this purchase comes very valid questions — Is one of the four aforementioned series being canned? Which licenses that Slightly Mad Studios owned could be used in Codemasters’ Grid series, and vice versa for the Project CARS series? Regardless of what theories we come up with, the best thing we can do is to wait for Codies to give us the answer..And you bet your buttons I’m excited to know what’s up.

Is the skatepark back in business? — Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater games possibly being remade

If you were around in the late-90’s and early-2000’s, you’ll most likely remember just how big of a deal the Tony Hawk game franchise was.  It brought skateboarding games to mainstream success thanks to its easy-to-pick-up gameplay, memorable music, and skatepark-sized amount of replay value.  And despite a nasty bail in the form of Tony Hawk’s Pro Skater 5, which was released shortly before Hawk and Activision Blizzard split ways, it doesn’t seem that all is lost.  Word on the street is that Activision are in the process of giving the first two games in the franchise (Maybe more) the remake treatment.  As a longtime fan of extreme sports games, this rumor has me absolutely pumped, and I hope this remake (Or package of remakes) really is a thing.  I have confidence that there is at least one studio at Activision that is fully capable of producing the game that Pro Skater 5 failed to be.  Maybe it’ll even be as good if not better than Skate 3.  In the meantime, all we can do is wait and find out if the Tony Hawk franchise truly is ready to drop into the halfpipe again.

Review of Pokémon Sword & Shield — Galar Calling

Since its 1996 debut, the international phenomenon in Pokémon has always seemed to cater towards the handheld-gaming crowd.  While there had been plenty of spin-offs and remakes for home consoles ranging from the N64 to the Wii U, having a portable system was a requirement if you wanted a piece of the core Pokémon lineup.  But thanks to the Switch, that prerequisite has been axed.  After three years of development, Pokémon Sword & Shield have arrived as the first main-series Pokémon games for home consoles.  I know these games have been the butt of backlash for several reasons, but it’s a still good duo of games on their own merit.  Let’s whip out our Pokédexes and converse about it.

Jolly ol’ Galar

The eighth generation of this heavily-revered franchise is set in the Galar region, which is based on the United Kingdom.  The plot is mostly the same as previous gens — You receive your starter Pokémon, learn the ropes of being a Trainer, and go on a quest to become the regional Pokémon champion.  Gym Battles are part of your journey again, except the lineup of Gym Leaders you face depends on which of these two versions you decide to play.

With tea or biscuits

Although features like Mega Evolutions and Z-Moves have been tossed and the Pokédex has been trimmed, there are plenty of new things to do in your latest Pokémon adventure.  You can take part in raids similar to those in Pokémon Go, have your Pokémon partake in special tasks, and even spend some time socializing and cooking meals with your Pokémon.  It should also be pointed out that the world now has a dynamic weather system, and the powerful critters can temporarily become larger in appearance thanks to Dynamax and Gigantamax forms.  Lastly, if you have some Pokémon from previous adventures that you’d like to bring along with you for this ride, you’ll be able to transfer them via the upcoming Pokémon Home service.

No Game, No Watch, Just Galar-y

Despite seeming like a very polarizing duo of games in its franchise, Pokémon Sword & Shield do what they can to provide you with more of the great Pokémon fun that’s been had since its late-90’s launch.  The new formula may seem a bit too streamlined to your liking at first; But once your adventure in the Galar region commences, you’ll have nothing to develop gripes about.

Review of Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games Tokyo 2020 — Oh no, there goes Tokyo

Everyone’s favorite plumber and hedgehog are once again going for the gold, as the Mario & Sonic at the Olympic Games series has come to the Nintendo Switch for its sixth installment.  Sure, it may seem like nothing more than a simple cash-grab, but there are some enjoyable new features to be delved into.  So without further ado, let’s light the torch and get into the review itself.

Time-travel turmoil

We haven’t seen a story mode in this series since the 3DS version of the London 2012 installment, but it returns in this edition.  After an opening confrontation, the competitors are inadvertently sent back in time to the Tokyo 1964 games (The setting of which is presented in 2D), and getting back to the present is going to be way easier said than done.  In the meantime, our heroes and villains must venture around the retro venues and compete in old-school 2D events, and there are also 10 special minigames that you must unlock in this mode before you can play them elsewhere.

It shines like gold

Tokyo 2020 has a big list of events to play, and there are some new ones like skateboarding, surfing, sport climbing, and karate.  Whether you’re playing the 2020, 1964, or Dream Events, each minigame comes equipped with tight control schemes, and you can choose between motion controls and standard gamepad controls.  While the controls are fluid and responsive, you still might want to read the instructions for each event in case they seem a little complex at first.

For the first time in the series, online multiplayer is included.  However, I feel that it is, at the very least, half-baked.  The tournament format in events like table tennis and badminton is ditched (Thus making them feel way too short in length), and you are unable to play the 1964 events.  These aren’t dealbreakers, but they make me believe that the online in Tokyo 2020 just isn’t for me.  If inviting three friends over (And possibly ordering a bunch of Pepsi and Domino’s Pizza) is what I need to do in order to get the multiplayer experience I truly want from this game, so be it. But hey, maybe the developers will improve the online multiplayer in a future patch.

It’s the final countdown

It may knock a few hurdles to the ground, but this is a decent comeback for the Mario & Sonic series and a fine debut for it on the Switch.  If you can stomach the fact that this isn’t supposed to be in the same league as minigame compilations like the Mario Party series, this Tokyo 2020 installment is a great place for you to go on the hunt for gold medals.